COURSES OFFERED At SOUTHERN WELLS Jr/Sr HIGH SCHOOL

2019-2020 School Year STATE APPROVED COURSE TITLES and DESCRIPTIONS

 

Table of Contents

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS

MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

WORLD LANGUAGES

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE)

CTE:  AGRICULTURE

CTE: BUSINESS

CTE: ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

CTE:  FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

CTE:  I.C.E. and W.B.L., CONSTRUCTION TRADES (offered at Southern Wells)

CTE:  Offered at Area 18 Partner Schools

FINE ARTS

MUSIC

VISUAL ARTS

HEALTH and WELLNESS and PHYSICAL EDUCATION

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS INTRODUCTION

The State Board of Education requires eight credits in English/Language Arts for graduation from Indiana high schools. All courses should be based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts or the Content Connectors for English/Language Arts.

 

ENGLISH 9  1002 (ENG 9) (LA30)

English 9, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9-10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, focusing on literature within an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write responses to literature, expository (informative), narrative, and argumentative/persuasive compositions, and sustained research assignments. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas.

 

ENGLISH 9 Honors 1002 (ENG 9) (LA32)

 

ENGLISH 10 1004 (ENG 10) (LA40)

English 10, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9- 10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, focusing on literature with an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write responses to literature, expository (informative) and argumentative/persuasive compositions, and sustained research assignments. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10

● Recommended Prerequisites: English 9 or teacher recommendation

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas

 

ENGLISH 10 Honors 1004 (ENG 10) (LA42)

 

ENGLISH 11 1006 (ENG 11) (LA50)

English 11, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 11-12, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing on literature with an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write narratives, responses to literature, academic essays (e.g. analytical, persuasive, expository, summary), and more sustained research assignments incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, charts and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11

● Recommended Prerequisites: English 9 and English 10 or teacher recommendation

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas

 

ENGLISH 12 1008 (ENG 12) (LA60)

English 12, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts for Grades 11- 12, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing on an exploration of point of view or perspective across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write narratives, responses to literature, academic essays (e.g. analytical, persuasive, expository, summary), and more sustained research assignments incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, charts, and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, and English 11 or teacher recommendation

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas

 

ADVANCED COMP (Dual Credit) 1098 (ADV COMP) (LA67)

Advanced Composition, a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study and application of the rhetorical writing strategies of exposition and persuasion. Students write expository critiques of nonfiction selections, literary criticism of fiction selections, persuasive compositions, and research reports in addition to other appropriate writing tasks. Course can be offered in conjunction with a literature course, or schools may embed Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts reading standards within curriculum.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, Composition, or teacher recommendation

● Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas

Offered as College Dual Credit at Southern Wells

 

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION 1058 (LIT/COMP AP) (LA69)

AP English Literature and Composition is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. Recommended Grade Level: 11,12 

       Recommended Prerequisites: English 9 and English 10 or teacher recommendation. Students should be able to read and comprehend college-level texts and apply the conventions of Standard Written English in their writing. 

       Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester 

       Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for grades 11 or 12 all diplomas

 

STUDENT MEDIA 1086 (STDNT MEDIA) (LA72)

Student Media, a course based on the High School Journalism Standards and the Student Media Standards, is the continuation of the study of Journalism. Students demonstrate their ability to do journalistic writing and design for high school media, including school newspapers, yearbooks, and a variety of other media formats. Students follow the ethical principles and legal boundaries that guide scholastic journalism. Students express themselves publicly with meaning and clarity for the purpose of informing, entertaining, or persuading. Students work on high school media staffs so that they may prepare themselves for career paths in journalism, communications, writing, or related fields.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 159 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions

● Recommended Prerequisites: Journalism, Mass Media, or teacher recommendation

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 8 credits maximum. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at advanced levels. May be offered over three or four years by subtitling the course Beginning, Intermediate, or Advanced.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors. NOTE: This is the designated School Media course, including newspaper and yearbook.

MATHEMATICS

ALGEBRA I 2520 (ALG I) (MA35)

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Algebra I is made up of 6 strands: Real Numbers and Expressions; Functions; Linear Equations, Inequalities, and Functions; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Exponential Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis and Statistics. These critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students will also engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

Fulfills the Algebra I/Integrated Mathematics I requirement for all diplomas

● Students pursuing Core 40, Core 40 with Academics Honors, or Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma should receive credit for Algebra I by the end of Grade 9

 

ALGEBRA I LAB (formerly Algebra Enrichment) 2516 (ALG I LAB) ( MA38)

Algebra I Lab is a mathematics support course for Algebra I. Algebra I Lab is taken while students are concurrently enrolled in Algebra I. This course provides students with additional time to build the foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, grade-level appropriate courses. The five critical areas of Algebra I Lab align with the critical areas of Algebra I: Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling. However, whereas Algebra I contains exclusively grade-level content, Algebra I Lab combines standards from high school courses with foundational standards from the middle grades.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Mathematics course for the General Diploma only or as an elective for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

● Algebra I Lab is designed as a support course for Algebra I. As such, a student taking Algebra I Lab must also be enrolled in Algebra I during the same academic year.

 

ALGEBRA II 2522 (ALG II) (MA47)
Algebra II builds on work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and allows for
students to extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical
functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to
expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving
quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using
the properties of logarithms. Algebra II is made up of seven strands: Complex Numbers and  Expressions; Functions; Systems of Equations; Quadratic Equations and Functions; Exponential & Logarithmic Equations and Functions; Polynomial, Rational, and Other Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

Fulfills the Algebra II/Integrated Mathematics III requirement for all diplomas

 

GEOMETRY 2532 (GEOM) (MA45)

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Seven critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Logic and Proofs; Points, Lines, Angles, and Planes; Triangles; Quadrilaterals and Other Polygons; Circles; Transformations; and Three-dimensional Solids. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

Fulfills the Geometry/Integrated Mathematics II requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

2524 ANALYTICAL ALGEBRA II (ANA ALG) (MA54)

Analytical Algebra II builds on previous work with linear, quadratic and exponential functions and extends to include polynomial, rational, radical, logarithmic, and other functions. Data analysis, statistics, and probability content should be included throughout the course, as students collect and use univariate and bivariate data to create and interpret mathematical models. Additionally, Analytical Algebra II should focus on the application of mathematics in various disciplines including business, finance, science, career and technical education, and social sciences, using technology to model real-world problems with various functions, using and translating between multiple representations. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course is not recommended for students interested in pursuing a STEM degree at a four year institution; this course does not prepare students for PreCalculus/Trigonometry.

       Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

       Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I  Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

       Fulfills the Algebra II/Integrated Mathematics III requirement for all diplomas; if students use this course to fulfill this credit, the parent and student must sign a consent form notifying the parent and the student that enrollment in Analytical Algebra II may affect the student’s ability to attend a particular post-secondary educational institution or enroll in a particular course at a particular post-secondary educational institution because Analytical Algebra II may not align with academic requirements established by the postsecondary educational institution.

 

PRE-CALCULUS 2564 (PRECAL) (MA55)

Pre-Calculus extends the foundations of algebra and functions developed in previous courses to new functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level sequences and series. The course provides students with the skills and understandings that are necessary for advanced manipulation of angles and measurement. Pre-Calculus is made up of five strands: Polar Coordinates and Complex Numbers; Functions; Quadratic, Polynomial, and Rational Equations and Functions; Exponential and Logarithmic Equations and Functions; and Parametric Equations. Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. The course is designed for students who expect math to be a major component of their future college and career experiences, and as such it is designed to provide students with strong foundations for calculus and other higher-level math courses. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry or Integrated Mathematics III

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

 

CCR BRIDGE: MATH READY 2514 (MATH RDY) (MA37)

The CCR Bridge: Math Ready course will include and reinforce the Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Statistics skills necessary to be ready for an entry-level college math course. This course emphasizes understanding of math concepts rather than just memorizing procedures. Math Ready students learn the context behind the procedure (e.g., why to use a certain formula or method to solve a problem). This equips them with higher-order thinking skills in order to apply math skills, functions and concepts in different situations. The course is intended for students who currently have achieved the minimum math requirements for college entry. The content of this course is designed to enhance students’ math skills so that they are ready for college-level math assignments. It is not designed to prepare students for college-level math in STEM majors.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: In grade 11, students who have not passed the Grade 10 Math ISTEP+ and have scored below a 45 on the PSAT test OR students who score below proficient on a diagnostic test should be placed in the Literacy Ready course.

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

 

AP CALCULUS AB 2562 (CALC AB AP) (MA60)

AP Calculus AB is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. AP Calculus AB is equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. This course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

       Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

       Required Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus  Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

       Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas

       Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

SCIENCE INTRODUCTION

Indiana’s Academic Standards for Science--2016 were adopted by the State Board of Education in April, 2016. The standards contain both content standards and process standards. The Science and Engineering Process Standards are the processes and skills that students are expected to learn and be able to do within the context of the science content. The separation of the process standards from the content standards is intentional; the separation of the standards explicitly shows that what students are doing while learning science is extremely important. The process standards reflect the way in which students are learning and doing science and are designed to work in tandem with the science content, resulting in robust instructional practice.

 

BIOLOGY I (L) 3024 (BIO I) (SC31)

Biology I is a course based on the following core topics: cellular structure and function, matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence; inheritance and variation in traits; evolution. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation, by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory, and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Fulfills the Biology requirement for all diplomas

 

BIOLOGY II General  (L) 3026 (BIO II) (SC34) (Dual Credit)

Biology II is an advanced laboratory, field, and literature investigations-based course. Students enrolled in Biology II examine in greater depth the structures, functions, and processes of living organisms. Students also analyze and describe the relationship of Earth’s living organisms to each other and to the environment in which they live. In this course, students refine their scientific inquiry skills as they collaboratively and independently apply their knowledge of the unifying themes of biology to biological questions and problems related to personal and community issues in the life sciences.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11

● Recommended Prerequisites: Biology I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a science course requirement for all diplomas

 

BIOLOGY II, Other (ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY) 5276 (A & P) (SC35) (Dual Credit) Anatomy & Physiology is a course in which students investigate concepts related to Health Science, with emphasis on interdependence of systems and contributions of each system to the maintenance of a healthy body. It introduces students to the cell, which is the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms, and covers tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems as an integrated unit. Through instruction, including laboratory activities, students apply concepts associated with Human Anatomy & Physiology. Students will understand the structure, organization and function of the various components of the healthy body in order to apply this knowledge in all health related fields.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Biology

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a science course requirement for all diplomas

 

BIOLOGY II, Other (Zoology and Botany) ADVANCED SCIENCE, COLLEGE CREDIT (L) 3090 (ADV SCI CC) (Dual Credit) (SC36 and SC37)

Advanced Science, College Credit is a title that covers (1) any science course offered for credit by an accredited post-secondary institution through an adjunct agreement with a secondary school, or (2) any other post-secondary science course offered for dual credit under the provisions of 511 IAC 6-10.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. May be offered for successive semesters

● Counts as a Science Course for all diplomas

● Courses that use this title are most often those taught through the post-secondary campus, taught either online or in traditional settings or a combination; and taught by higher education faculty.

● Courses that use this title are those that do not meet specific high school standards for a corresponding high school course, as they are standards beyond what is taught in the high school.

 

CHEMISTRY (L) 3064 (CHEM I) (SC50)

Chemistry I is a course based on the following core topics: properties and states of matter; atomic structure and the Periodic Table; bonding and molecular structure; reactions and stoichiometry; behavior of gases; thermochemistry; solutions; acids and bases. Students enrolled in Chemistry I compare, contrast, and synthesize useful models of the structure and properties of matter and the mechanisms of its interactions. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation, by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory, and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra II (can be taken concurrently)

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a science (physical) course requirement for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE (L) 3044 (EAS SCI I) (SC40) Earth and Space Science I is a course focused on the following core topics: universe; solar system; Earth cycles and systems; atmosphere and hydrosphere; solid Earth; Earth processes. Students analyze and describe earth’s interconnected systems and examine how earth’s materials, landforms, and continents are modified across geological time. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation, by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory, and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

● Fulfills a science course requirement for all diplomas 3044A (recommended local course code)

 

INTEGRATED CHEMISTRY-PHYSICS (L) 3108 (ICP) (SC38)

Integrated Chemistry-Physics is a course focused on the following core topics: constant velocity; uniform acceleration; Newton’s Laws of motion (one dimension); energy; particle theory of matter; describing substances; representing chemical change; electricity and magnetism; waves; nuclear energy. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9

● Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I (may be taken concurrently with this course)

● Credits: A two credit course

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a science (physical) course requirement for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course

 

PHYSICS I (L) 3084 (PHYS I) (SC60)

Physics I is a course focused on the following core topics: constant velocity; constant acceleration; forces; energy; linear momentum in one dimension; simple harmonic oscillating systems; mechanical waves and sound; simple circuit analysis. Instruction should focus on 260 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation, by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory, and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11

● Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra I or II

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a science (physical) course requirement for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

AP CHEMISTRY (L) 3060 (CHEM AP) ( SC50)

AP Chemistry is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. The content includes: (1) structure of matter: atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, molecular models, nuclear chemistry; (2) states of matter: gases, liquids and solids, solutions; and (3) reactions: reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.  Recommended Grade Level: 12 

       Recommended Prerequisite: Chemistry I, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry  Credits:

       2 semester course, 1 credit per semester 

       Counts as a Science Course for all diplomas

       Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

WORLD LANGUAGES

SPANISH I 2120 (SPAN I) (FL30)

Spanish I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Spanish language learning, and to various aspects of Spanish-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write short passages with guidance. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as reading isolated words and phrases in a situational context and comprehending brief written or oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester 313 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma SPANISH II

 

SPANISH II 2122 (SPAN II) (FL32)

Spanish II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Required Prerequisites: Spanish I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma

 

SPANISH III 2124 (SPAN III) (FL34) (Offered for Dual Credit)

Spanish III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending detailed written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of Spanish speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Required Prerequisites: Spanish I and II

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester 314 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE) INTRODUCTION

Career and Technical Education (CTE) course titles and descriptions are included in this document under the primary CTE subject area headings of:

● Career and Technical Education (CTE)

● CTE: Agriculture

● CTE: Business, Marketing and IT

● CTE: Engineering/Technology

● CTE: Family and Consumer Sciences

● CTE: Work Based Learning

● CTE: Health Science and Trade and Industry

In addition, there are course titles and descriptions in the Advanced Placement, and Dual Credit that may also be considered to be Indiana CTE courses after a review of course standards by the IDOE Office of Career and Technical Education, i.e. Biology II Anatomy at Southern Wells.

CTE:  AGRICULTURE INTRODUCTION

Agriculture is an active part of the curriculum for many high schools in Indiana. This program area combines home, school and community as the means of education in agriculture and natural resources. The courses provide a solid foundation of academic knowledge and handson applications through classroom activities, laboratory experiments, project-based learning, supervised agricultural experiences (SAE) and FFA. The vision and mission of Indiana’s Agriculture program is that all people understand and value the vital role of agriculture, food, fiber, and natural resource systems to advance personal and global well-being, prepare students for successful careers, and make a lifetime of informed choices in agriculture. The Agricultural Education goals are for providing students with learning experiences that will allow them to:

Demonstrate desirable work ethics and work habits.

● Apply the basic competencies and background knowledge in agriculture and related occupations.

● Analyze entrepreneurial, business and management skills needed to enter agriculture and related occupations.

● Expand leadership and participatory skills necessary for the development of productive and contributing citizenship in our democratic society.

● Gain effective social and interpersonal communication skills.

Be aware of career opportunities in agriculture and set career objectives.

● Acquire job-seeking, employability and job-retention skills.

● Advance in a career through a program of continuing education and lifelong learning.

● Apply reading, writing, mathematics, communication and study skills.

● Recognize the interaction of agriculture with governments and economic systems at the local, state, national and global levels.

● Recognize the ways new technologies impact agriculture and how agriculture impacts the environment. It is important to understand and reaffirm that career-technical experiences do not preclude students from going on to higher education; in fact, participation enhances the opportunity. A growing number of students are combining college and career preparation in their high school pathway plans. Agriculture and FFA have a long history of successfully preparing students for both entry-level careers and further education in the science, business and technology of agriculture. The programs combine classroom instruction and hands-on career focused learning to develop students’ potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success.

FFA

The FFA student leadership organization is an integral part of a total agricultural education program. Local agriculture teacher(s) serve as the FFA chapter advisors. The many activities of the FFA parallel the methodology of the instructional program and are directly related to the occupational goals and objectives. District and state level FFA activities provide opportunities for students to demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge, skills and aptitudes acquired through the agriculture program. Agriculture students demonstrating a high degree of competence in 55 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions state level FFA activities are highly encouraged to represent their local communities, districts and state by participating in national FFA activities. Instructional activities of the FFA require participation by the agriculture students as an integral part of an agricultural education course of instruction and, therefore, may be considered an appropriate use and amount of the allotted instructional time.

 

AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT 5002 (AG BUS MGMT) (AG32) (Dual Credit)

Agribusiness Management provides foundation concepts in agricultural business. It is a two semester course that introduces students to the principles of business organization and management from a local and global perspective, with the utilization of technology. Concepts covered in the course include; accounting and record keeping, business planning and management, food and fiber, forms of business, finance, management, sales and marketing, careers, leadership development. Students will demonstrate principles and techniques for planning, development, application and management of agribusiness systems through a supervised agriculture experience (work based learning) programs.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as an Elective or Directed Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

AGRICULTURE POWER, STRUCTURE AND TECHNOLOGY 5088 (AG POW) (AG36) (Dual Credit)

Agriculture Power,Structure and Technology is a two semester, up to six semester, lab intensive course in which students develop an understanding of basic principles of tool selection, operation, maintenance, and management of agricultural equipment in concert with the utilization of technology. Topics covered include: safety, problem solving/troubleshooting, electricity, plumbing, concrete, carpentry, metal technology, engines, emerging technologies, leadership development, supervised agricultural experience, and career opportunities in the area of agriculture power, structure, and technology.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credit(s) per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 5008 (ANML SCI) (AG40)

Animal Science is a two-semester program that provides students with an overview of the animal agriculture industry. Students participate in a large variety of activities and laboratory work including real and simulated animal science experiences and projects. All areas that the students study may be applied to both large and small animals. Topics to be covered in the course include: history and trends in animal agriculture, laws and practices relating to animal agriculture, comparative anatomy and physiology of animals, biosecurity threats and interventions relating to animal and human safety, nutrition, reproduction, careers, leadership, and supervised agricultural experiences relating to animal agriculture.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Life Science or Physical Science requirement for the General Diploma

 

ADVANCED ANIMAL SCIENCE - ADVANCED LIFE SCIENCE: ANIMALS (L) 5070 (ALS ANIML) (AG49)

 Advanced Life Science: Animals is a two-semester course that provides students with opportunities to participate in a variety of activities including laboratory work. Students will explore concepts related to history and trends in animal agriculture as related to animal welfare, husbandry, diseases and parasites, laws and practices relating to handling, housing, environmental impact, global sustainable practices of animal agriculture, genetics, breeding practices, biotechnology uses, and comparative knowledge of anatomy and physiology of animals used in animal agriculture.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Required Prerequisite: Animal Science

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, Biology, Chemistry, Integrated Chemistry Physics

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as an Elective or Directed Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Core 40 Science requirement for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES 5056 (INT AGFNR) (AG30) Introduction to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources is a two semester course that is highly recommended as a prerequisite to and as a foundation for all other agricultural classes. Through hands-on learning activities, students are encouraged to investigate areas of agriculture. Students are introduced to the following areas of agriculture: animal science, plant and soil science, food science, horticultural science, agricultural business management, natural resources, agriculture power, structure, and technology, careers in agriculture, leadership, and supervised agricultural experience. An activity and project based approach is used along with team building to enhance the effectiveness of the student learning activities.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

CTE: BUSINESS,MARKETING, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

BUSINESS, MARKETING, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, ENTREPRENEURSHIP INTRODUCTION Business and industry surveys indicate that economic survival in the 21st Century will demand that students know and understand both fundamental and technical concepts of business as well as possess the ability to execute these concepts in nearly any setting. All persons regardless of age, gender, and career aspirations, can benefit from participating in Business, Marketing, Information Technology, and Entrepreneurship education. These programs provide a foundation for success for all students. Business Professionals of America (BPA)

BPA is a co-curricular student organization conducted on regional, state, and national level sand tests competency in various areas of business/office occupations. The words “Business,” “Professionals,” and “America” define the focus of BPA. Business: The field for which we prepare our students; emphasizes that we educate our students to work efficiently, not only in an office setting, but also in a wide variety of business situations. Professionals: Our students indicate they join BPA to take advantage of a wide variety of professional development opportunities. America: Symbolizes pride in our country and its free enterprise business system. The Special Recognition Awards Program and the Torch Awards Program are open to participation by all chapters and recognizes outstanding, actively involved members on the local, regional, state, and national levels.

 

DIGITAL APPLICATIONS AND RESPONSIBILITY 4528 (DIG APPS RESP) (BU33)

Digital Applications and Responsibility prepares students to use technology in an effective and appropriate manner in school, in a job, or everyday life. Students develop skills related to word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and communications software. Students learn what it means to be a good digital citizen and how to use technology, including social media, responsibly. Students expand their knowledge of how to use digital devices and software to build decision-making and problem-solving skills. Students should be provided with the opportunity to seek industry-recognized digital literacy certifications.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

● Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING 4524 (INTO ACCT) (BU43)

Introduction to Accounting introduces the language of business using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting. Emphasis is placed on accounting principles as they relate to both manual and automated financial systems. This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision-making.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the all diplomas

 

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 4518 (INTO BUSS) (BU34)

Introduction to Business introduces students to the world of business, including the concepts, functions, and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in the twenty first century on a local, national, and/or international scale. The course covers business management, entrepreneurship, marketing fundamentals, and business ethics and law. The course develops business vocabulary and provides an overview of business and the role that business plays in economic, social, and political environments.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

● Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP 5967 (INTO ENTR) (BU37)

Introduction to Entrepreneurship provides an overview of what it means to be an entrepreneur. Student will learn about starting and operating a business, marketing products and services, and how to find resources to help in the development of a new venture. This course is ideal for students interested in starting their own art gallery, salon, restaurant, etc.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

 ● Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

PERSONAL FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 4540 (PRS FIN RSP) (BU50)

Personal Financial Responsibility addresses the identification and management of personal financial resources to meet the financial needs and wants of individuals and families, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, and maintenance factors. This course helps students build skills in financial responsibility and decision making; analyze personal standards, needs, wants, and goals; identify sources of income, saving and investing; understand banking, budgeting, record-keeping and managing risk, insurance and credit card debt. A project based approach and applications through authentic settings such as work based observations and service learning experiences are appropriate. Direct, concrete applications of mathematics proficiencies in projects are encouraged.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

PREPARING FOR COLLEGE AND CAREERS 5394 (PREP CC) (BU31)  Preparing for College and Careers addresses the knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to be prepared for success in college, career, and life. The focus of the course is the impact of today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities. Topics to be addressed include twenty first century life and career skills; higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, values, and goals; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members; planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work; and managing personal resources. This course includes reviewing the 16 national career clusters and Indiana's College and Career Pathways, in-depth investigation of one or more pathways, reviewing graduation plans, developing career plans, and developing personal and career portfolios. A project-based approach, including computer and technology applications, cooperative ventures between school and community, simulations, and real life experiences, is recommended.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum

● Qualifies as one of the FACS courses a student can take to waive the Health & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for a waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, please see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c) (6).

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 4562 (BUS MGMT) (BU35)

Principles of Business Management focuses on the roles and responsibilities of managers as well as opportunities and challenges of ethically managing a business in the free-enterprise system. Students will attain an understanding of management, team building, leadership, problem-solving steps and processes that contribute to the achievement of organizational goals. The management of human and financial resources is emphasized.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Business

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 5914 (PRN MRKT) (BU47)

Principles of Marketing provides a basic introduction to the scope and importance of marketing in the global economy. Emphasis is placed on oral and written communications, mathematical applications, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills as they relate to advertising/promotion/selling, distribution, financing, marketing-information management, pricing, and product/service management.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 4518 (INTO BUSS) (BU34)

Introduction to Business introduces students to the world of business, including the concepts, functions, and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in the twenty first century on a local, national, and/or international scale. The course covers business management, entrepreneurship, marketing fundamentals, and business ethics and law. The course develops business vocabulary and provides an overview of business and the role that business plays in economic, social, and political environments.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

● Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

CTE: ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

 

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN 4812 PLTW (IED)4802 non-PLTW(INT ENG DES) (IT32)

 Introduction to Engineering Design is a fundamental pre-engineering course where students become familiar with the engineering design process. Students work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using industry standard sketches and current 3D design and modeling software to represent and communicate solutions. Students apply their knowledge through hands-on projects and document their work with the use of an engineering notebook. Students begin with completing structured activities and move to solving open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills. Ethical issues related to professional practice and product development are also presented. NOTE: Use of the PLTW Course number is limited to schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network and follow all training and data collection requirements.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

INTRODUCTION TO MANUFACTURING 4784 (INT MAN) (IT49)

Introduction to Manufacturing is a course that specializes in how people use modern manufacturing systems through an introduction to manufacturing technology and its relationship to society, individuals, and the environment. This understanding is developed through the study of the two major technologies, material processing and management technology, used by all manufacturing enterprises. Students will apply the skills and knowledge of using modern manufacturing processes to obtain resources and change them into industrial materials, industrial products and consumer products Students will investigate the properties of engineered materials such as: metallics, polymers, ceramics, and composites. After gaining a working knowledge of these materials, students will study six major types of material processes: casting and molding; forming; separating; conditioning; finishing; and assembling.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10

 

ADVANCED CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION, COLLEGE CREDIT 5238 (ADV CTE CC) Advanced Career and Technical Education, College Credit is a course title covering any CTE advanced course offered for credit by an accredited post-secondary institution through an adjunct agreement with a secondary school. The intent of this course is to allow students to earn college credit for courses with content that goes beyond that currently approved for high school credit.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: CTE courses that would help prepare the student for success in this area.

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. May be offered for successive semesters

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Courses that use this title are most often those taught through the post-secondary campus, taught either

online or in traditional settings or a combination of the two; and taught by higher education faculty.

● Courses that use this title are those that do not meet specific high school standards for a corresponding

high school course, as they are standards beyond what is taught in the high school.

 

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING I 5608 (ADV MFTG I) (IT52)

(in the D.O.E. catalog under Trade and Industry)

Advanced Manufacturing I is a course that includes classroom and laboratory experiences in two broad areas: Industrial Technology/Software Controls and Manufacturing Trends. Domains include safety and impact, electricity, manufacturing essentials, fluid power principles, mechanical principles, lean manufacturing, and careers in advanced manufacturing. Hands-on projects and team activities will allow students to apply learning on the latest industry technologies. Students take this course with the goal of being a skilled machine operator, repair technician, or working in management at any company that produces goods and services using advanced manufacturing techniques. Work based learning experiences and industry partnerships are highly encouraged for an authentic industry experience.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING II 5606 (ADV MFTG II)

Advanced Manufacturing II builds on classroom and lab experiences students experienced in Advanced Manufacturing I. Domains include safety and impact, drafting principles, manufacturing programming, CAD/CAM and CNC technologies, automation and robotics, and careers in advanced manufacturing. Hands-on projects and team activities will allow students to apply learning on the latest industry technologies. Students continue this course with the goal of being a skilled machine operator, repair technician, or management at any company that produces goods and services using advanced manufacturing techniques. Work based learning experiences and industry partnerships are highly encouraged for an authentic industry experience.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisites: Advanced Manufacturing I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

CTE:  FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES INTRODUCTION Family and Consumer Sciences has roots in both academic and career and technical education and easily reaches beyond the education system into the community as it focuses on the needs of individuals and families. Essential preparation for success of all students includes acquisition of problem-solving, decision-making, higher order thinking, communication, literacy, and numerical skills in applied contexts. As the future members and leaders of tomorrow's families, workplaces, and communities, students need to be able to act responsibly and productively, to synthesize knowledge from multiple sources, to work cooperatively, and to apply the highest standards in all aspects of their lives. High school Family and Consumer Sciences is organized into a variety of semester-long and year-long courses. State-approved high school Family and Consumer Sciences courses and the curriculum framework for each course provide guidelines for local High school Family and Consumer Sciences programs that focus on building strong and resilient individuals and families and helping students manage personal and family issues. The High school Family and Consumer Sciences course frameworks reflect the current vision and mission statements for Family and Consumer Sciences and the 2018 High school Family and Consumer Sciences National Standards and provide consistency among High school Family and Consumer Sciences programs across the state. FCCLA Family, Career & Community Leaders of America is the official student organization for Family and Consumer Sciences Education in Indiana and across the country.

 

The FCCLA organization helps students develop leadership and citizenship skills while synthesizing and applying Family and Consumer Sciences content and skills in family, workplace, and community settings. As a teaching/learning approach, FCCLA offers teacher-developed and student-tested strategies and materials that center the responsibility for achieving FACS standards on students through inclass and co-curricular chapter programs and projects.

 

ADVANCED CHILD DEVELOPMENT 5360 (ADVCHLDDEV) (FS62)

Advanced Child Development is for those students interested in life foundations, academic enrichment, and/or careers related to knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from age 4 through age 8 (grade 3). It builds on the Child Development course, which is a prerequisite. Advanced Child Development includes the study of professional and ethical issues in child development; child growth and development; child development theories, research, and best practices; child health and wellness; teaching and guiding children; special conditions affecting children; and career exploration in child development and nurturing. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning, introductory laboratory/field experiences with children in preschool and early elementary school settings, and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Child Development

● Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

ADVANCED NUTRITION AND WELLNESS 5340 (ADV NTRN WEL) (FS32)

Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is a course which provides an extensive study of nutrition. This course is recommended for all students wanting to improve their nutrition and learn how nutrition affects the body across the lifespan. Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is an especially appropriate course for students interested in careers in the medical field, athletic training and dietetics. This course builds on the foundation established in Nutrition and Wellness, which is a required prerequisite. This is a project-based course; utilizing higher-order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes. Topics include extensive study of major nutrients, nutritional standards across the lifespan, influences on nutrition/food choices, technological and scientific influences, and career exploration in this field. Laboratory experiences will be utilized to develop food handling and preparation skills; attention will be given to nutrition, food safety and sanitation. This course is the second in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Nutrition and Wellness

● Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 5362 (CHLD DEV) (FS60)

Child Development is an introductory course for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers that draw on knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from conception/prenatal through age 3. It includes the study of prenatal development and birth; growth and development of children; child care giving and nurturing; and support systems for parents and caregivers. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Authentic applications such as introductory laboratory/field experiences with young children and/or service learning that build knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum

● Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Health & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c)(6).

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

EDUCATION PROFESSIONS I 5408 (ED PROF I) (FS65) (Dual Credit)

Education Professions I provides the foundation for employment in education and related careers and prepares students for study in higher education. An active learning approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of education and related careers. The course of study includes, but is not limited to: the teaching profession, the learner and the learning process, planning instruction, learning environment, and instructional and assessment strategies. Exploratory field experiences in classroom settings and career portfolios are required components. A standards-based plan guides the students’ field experiences. Students are monitored in their field experiences by the Education Professionals I teacher. Articulation with post-secondary programs is encouraged.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11,12

● Required Prerequisites: Advance Child Development

● Recommended Prerequisites: Nutrition and Wellness, Child Development, and Interpersonal Relationships

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

EDUCATION PROFESSIONS II 5404 (ED PROF II) (Must have had ED PRO I) (Dual Credit)

 

HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN CAREERS I 5352 (HIDC I) (FS80)

Housing and Interior Design Careers I prepares students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of career clusters that encompass careers related to housing, interiors, and furnishings. Topics include commercial applications of principles of design to creating aesthetic and functional residential and commercial environments; human, non-human, community, family, and financial resources for housing; housing and interiors materials and products; client-centered designing, drafting, blue printing, and space planning; rendering, elevations, and sketching; historical, technological, and environmental impacts on housing and interiors; zoning, building codes, regulations, and accessibility guidelines, and their impact on housing related outcomes. Ethical, legal, and safety issues as well as helping processes and collaborative ways of working with others are to be addressed. Intensive laboratory experiences with commercial applications are a required component of this course of study. Work based experiences in the housing, interiors, and/or furnishings industries are strongly encouraged.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Preparing for College and Careers, Introduction to Housing and Interior Design

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS 5364 (INTRP RLT) (FS52)

Interpersonal Relationships is an introductory course that is especially relevant for students interested in careers that involve interacting with people. It is also valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. This course addresses knowledge and skills needed for positive and productive relationships in career, community, and family settings. Major course topics include communication skills; leadership, teamwork, and collaboration; conflict prevention, resolution, and management; building and maintaining relationships; and individual needs and characteristics and their impacts on relationships. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of interpersonal relationships. Direct, concrete language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education for all career areas that involve interacting with people both inside and outside of a business/organization, including team members, clients, patients, customers, and the general public.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas; local programs have the option of offering a second version of the course that is focused more on family relations. Such a course may be differentiated from the regular course offering by using a subtitle in addition to Interpersonal Relationships. A student may earn credits for both versions of the course. No waiver is required in this instance.

● Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Health & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c)(6).

 

INTRODUCTION TO FASHION AND TEXTILES 5380 (FSHNTX) (FS40)

Introduction to Fashion and Textiles is an introductory course for those students interested in academic enrichment or a career in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry. This course addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the fashion, textile, and apparel arena. The course includes the study of personal, academic, and career success; careers in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry; factors influencing the merchandising and selection of fashion, textile, and apparel goods and their properties, design, and production; and consumer skills. A project-based approach integrates instruction and laboratory experiences including application of the elements and principles of design, aesthetics, criticism, history and production; selection, production, alteration, repair, and maintenance of apparel and textile products; product research, development, and testing; and application of technical tools and equipment utilized in the industry. Direct, concrete mathematics proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in fashion, textile, and apparel-related careers.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1-2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

 

NUTRITION AND WELLNESS 5342 (NTRN WLNS) (FS30) Nutrition and Wellness is an introductory course valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers related to nutrition, food, and wellness. This is a nutrition class that introduces students to only the basics of food preparation so they can become self-sufficient in accessing healthy and nutritious foods. Major course topics include nutrition principles and applications; influences on nutrition and wellness; food preparation, safety, and sanitation; and science, technology, and careers in nutrition and wellness. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of nutrition, food, and wellness. Food preparation experiences are a required component. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. This course is the first in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Health & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c)(6).

● Local programs have the option of offering a second version of the course that is focused more on the fitness aspects of wellness and nutrition. This version may be taught within the family and consumer sciences department or it may be interdisciplinary and team taught or co-taught with a teacher licensed in physical education. Such a course may be differentiated from the regular course offering by using a subtitle in addition to Nutrition and Wellness. A student may earn credits for multiple versions of the course. No waiver is required in this instance.

● Local programs may offer an additional version of this course for a specific student population, for instance, seniors who have never taken nutrition or foods courses. Such a course may be differentiated from the regular course offering by using a subtitle in addition to Nutrition and Wellness. A student may earn credits for multiple versions of the course. No waiver is required in this instance.

 

CTE:  I.C.E. and WBL, Construction Trades (offered at Southern Wells)

 

INTERDISCIPLINARY COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 5902 (ICE) (VO30)

Interdisciplinary Cooperative Education (ICE) spans all career and technical education program areas through an interdisciplinary approach to training for employment. Time allocations are a minimum of fifteen hours per week of work based learning and approximately five hours per week of school-based instruction. Additionally, all state and federal laws and regulations related to student employment and cooperative education must be followed. The following two components must be included as part of the Interdisciplinary Cooperative Education course Related Instruction, that is classroom based, shall be organized and planned around the activities associated with the student’s individual job and career objectives in a career cluster area/pathway; and shall be taught during the same semesters as the student is receiving on the-job training. For a student to become occupationally competent and therefore employable, the related instruction should cover in varying proportions: (a) general occupational competencies, (b) specific occupational competencies, and (c) specific job competencies. On-the-Job Training is the actual work experience in an occupation in any one of the Indiana College and Career Pathways that relates directly to the student’s career objectives. On-the-job, the student shall have the opportunity to apply the concepts, skills, and attitudes learned during Related Instruction, as well as the skills and knowledge that have been learned in other courses. The student shall be placed on-the-job under the direct supervision of experienced employees who serve as on-the-job trainers/supervisors in accordance with predetermined training plans and agreements and who assist in evaluating the student’s job performance. Students in an ICE placement must be paid in accordance with federal and state student employment and cooperative education laws. 151 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisite: a minimum of 4 credits in a logical sequence of courses related to the student’s pathway and the work site placement

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas Indiana Department of Education

 

WORK BASED LEARNING CAPSTONE 5974 (WBL) (VO12)

Work Based Learning Capstone is a stand-alone course that prepares students for college and career. This strategy builds students’ skills and knowledge in their chosen career path. Work Based Learning Capstone experiences occur in workplaces and involve an employer assigning a student meaningful job tasks to develop his or her skills, knowledge, and readiness for work. A clear partnership agreement and training plan is developed by the student, teacher, and workplace mentor/supervisor to guide the student’s work based experiences and assist in evaluating achievement and performance. In stand-alone WBL Capstone courses, students have the opportunity to apply the concepts, skills, and dispositions learned in their pathways in real world business and industry settings. Therefore, at six credits in a student’s pathway would be prerequisite to the student enrolling in the stand-alone WBL course. Work Based experiences need to be in an industry setting closely related to a student’s CTE pathway. Instructors must have a clear partnership agreement and training plan for each student participating in Work Based experiences. When a course is offered for multiple hours per semester, the amount of authentic work experience needs to be increased proportionally.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisites: a minimum of 4 credits of introductory and advanced career and technical education courses related to a student’s pathway and to the work site placement

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

CONSTRUCTION TRADES I 5580 (CONST TECH I) (VO20)

Construction Trades I classroom and laboratory experiences involve the formation, installation, maintenance, and repair of buildings, homes, and other structures. A history of construction, future trends and career options, reading technical drawings and transforming those drawings into physical structures are covered. The relationship of views and details, interpretation of dimension, transposing scale, tolerance, electrical symbols, sections, materials list, architectural plans, geometric construction, three dimensional drawing techniques, and sketching will be presented as well as elementary aspects of residential design and site work. Areas of emphasis will include print reading and drawing, room schedules and plot plans. Students will examine the design and construction of floor and wall systems and develop layout and floor construction skills. Blueprints and other professional planning documents will also be covered. Students will develop an understanding and interpretation of the Indiana Residential Code for one and two family dwellings and safety practices including Occupational Safety and Health Administration Safety and Health Standards for the construction industry.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Construction

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

CONSTRUCTION TRADES II 5578 (CONST TRA II) (VO22)

Construction Trades II builds on the formation, installation, maintenance, and repair skills learned in Construction Trades I. Information on materials, occupations, and professional organizations within the industry will be covered. Students will develop basic knowledge, skills, and awareness of interior trim and the installation of drywall, moldings, interior doors, kitchen cabinets, and baseboard moldings. Students will also develop exterior finishing competencies. The course includes instruction on the installation of cornices, windows, doors and various types of sidings currently used in industry. Studies will also focus on the design and construction of roof systems and the use of framing squares for traditional rafter and truss roofing.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisites: Construction Trades I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

 

CTE:  Offered at Area 18 Partner Schools

 

FIRE AND RESCUE I 5820 (FIRE RSCU I) (VO61)

Fire and Rescue I; Every year, fires and other emergencies take thousands of lives and destroy property worth billions of dollars. Firefighters and emergency services workers help protect the public against these dangers by rapidly responding to a variety of emergencies. They are frequently the first emergency personnel at the scene of a traffic accident or medical emergency and may be called upon to put out a fire, treat injuries or perform other vital functions. The Fire and Rescue curriculum may include five Indiana state fire certifications: (1) Mandatory, (2) Firefighter I, (3) Firefighter II, (4) Hazardous Materials Awareness, and (5) Hazardous Materials Operations. An additional two industry certifications may be earned by adding (6) First Responder, and (7) Emergency Medical Technician-Basic to the curriculum.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Interpersonal Relationships

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas FIRE AND RESCUE II 5826 (FIRE RSCU II) Fire and Rescue II builds on skills learned in Fire and Rescue I. The Fire and Rescue curriculum may include five Indiana state fire certifications: (1) Mandatory, (2) Firefighter I, (3) Firefighter II, (4) Hazardous Materials Awareness, and (5) Hazardous Materials Operations. An additional two industry certifications may be earned by adding (6) First Responder, and (7) Emergency Medical Technician-Basic to the curriculum.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisites: Fire and Rescue I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

PRECISION MACHINING I 5782 (PCSN MACH I) (VO70)

Precision Machining I provides students with a basic understanding of the precision machining processes used in industry, manufacturing, maintenance, and repair. The course instructs the student in industrial safety, terminology, tools and machine tools, measurement and layout. Students will become familiar with the setup and operation of power saws, drill presses, lathes, milling machines, grinders and an introduction to CNC (computer numerically controlled) machines.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course 143 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions

 

PRECISION MACHINING II 5784 (PCSN MACH II) (VO72)

Precision Machining II is a more in-depth study of skills learned in Precision Machining I, with a stronger focus in CNC setup/operation/programming. Classroom activities will concentrate on precision set-up and inspection work as well as machine shop calculations. Students will develop skills in advanced machining and measuring parts involving tighter tolerances and more complex geometry. A continued focus on safety will also be included.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisites: Precision Machining I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

WELDING TECHNOLOGY I 5776 (WELD TECH I) (VO59)

Welding Technology I includes classroom and laboratory experiences that develop a variety of skills in oxy-fuel cutting and Shielded Metal Arc welding. This course is designed for individuals who intend to make a career as a Welder, Technician, Sales, Designer, Researcher or Engineer. Emphasis is placed on safety at all times. OSHA standards and guidelines endorsed by the American Welding Society (AWS) are used. Instructional activities emphasize properties of metals, safety issues, blueprint reading, electrical principles, welding symbols, and mechanical drawing through projects and exercises that teach students how to weld and be prepared for college and career success.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: None

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

WELDING TECHNOLOGY II 5778 (WELD TECH II)

Welding Technology II builds on the skills covered in Welding Technology I. Emphasis is placed on safety at all times. OSHA standards and guidelines endorsed by the American Welding Society (AWS) are used. Instructional activities emphasize properties of metals, safety issues, blueprint reading, electrical principles, welding symbols, and mechanical drawing through projects and exercises that teach students how to weld and be prepared for college and career success. 

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisites: Welding Technology I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION I 5282 (HLTH ED I) (VO42)

Health Science Education I is a course designed to provide a foundation of skills development to specific health careers including; patient care, nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, and public health. Students will also receive an introduction to healthcare systems, anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. Laboratory experiences with industry applications are organized and planned around the activities associated with the student's career objectives. Job seeking and job maintenance skills, personal management skills, self analysis to aid in career selection and completion of the application process for admission into a post-secondary program of their choice are also included in this course. Participation in HOSA 116 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions encourages the development of leadership, communication and career related skills, and opportunities for community service.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Health Science Careers

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, maximum of 6 credits

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

CULINARY ARTS AND HOSPITALITY I 5440 (CULART HOSP) (VO54) Culinary Arts and Hospitality I prepares students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of careers in the hospitality industry. This course builds a foundation that prepares students to enter the Advanced Culinary Arts or Advanced Hospitality courses. Major topics include: introduction to the hospitality industry; food safety and personal hygiene; sanitation and safety; regulations, procedures, and emergencies; basic culinary skills; culinary math; and food preparation techniques and applications; principles of purchasing, storage, preparation, and service of food and food products; ; apply basic principles of sanitation and safety in order to maintain safe and healthy food service and hospitality environments; use and maintain related tools and equipment; and apply management principles in food service or hospitality operations. Intensive laboratory experiences with commercial applications are a required component of this course of study. Student laboratory experiences may be either school-based or "on-the-job" or a combination of the two. Work based experiences in the food industry are strongly encouraged. A standards-based plan guides the students’ laboratory experiences. Students are monitored in their laboratory experiences by the Culinary Arts and Hospitality teacher. Articulation with post-secondary programs is encouraged. 

● Recommended Grade Level: 11,12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Nutrition and Wellness, Introduction to Culinary Arts & Hospitality

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES TECHNOLOGY I 5510 (AUTO TECH I) (VO10)

Automotive Services Technology I is a one year course that encompasses the sub topics of the NATEF/ ASE identified areas of Steering & Suspension and Braking Systems. This one year course offering may be structured in a series of two topics per year offered in any combination of instructional strategies of semester based or yearlong instruction. Additional areas of manual transmissions and differentials, automatic transmissions, air conditioning, and engine repair should be covered as time permits. This one year offering must meet the NATEF program certifications for the two primary areas offered in this course. This course provides the opportunity for dual credit for students who meet post-secondary requirements for earning dual credit and successfully complete the dual credit requirements of this course. Mathematical skills will be reinforced through precision measuring activities as well as cost estimation and calculation activities. Scientific principles taught and reinforced in this course include the study of viscosity, friction, thermal expansion, and compound solutions. Written and oral skills will also be emphasized to help students communicate with customers, colleagues, and supervisors.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Transportation

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES TECHNOLOGY II 5546 (AUTO TECH II)(VO15) Automotive Services Technology II is a one year course that encompasses the sub topics of the NATEF/ASE identified areas of Electrical Systems and Engine Performance. This one year course offering may be structured in a series of two topics per year offered in any combination of instructional strategies of semester based or yearlong instruction. Additional areas of manual transmissions /differentials, automatic transmissions, air conditioning, and engine repair should be covered as time permits. This one-year offering must meet the NATEF program certifications for the two primary areas offered in this course. Mathematical skills will be reinforced through precision measuring activities and cost estimation/calculation activities. Scientific principles taught and reinforced in this course include the study of viscosity, friction, thermal expansion, and compound solutions. Written and oral skills will also be emphasized to help students communicate with customers, colleagues, and supervisors.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisites: Automotive Services Technology I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE I 4801 (COM SCI I) (VO90) (listed under CTE Business in D.O.E. catalog) Computer Science I introduces the structured techniques necessary for the efficient solution of business-related computer programming logic problems and coding solutions into a high-level language. The fundamental concepts of programming are provided through explanations and effects of commands and hands-on utilization of lab equipment to produce accurate outputs. Topics include program flow-charting, pseudo coding, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving problems. The course covers creating file layouts, print charts, program narratives, user documentation, and system flowcharts for business problems; algorithm development and review, flowcharting, input/output techniques, looping, modules, selection structures, file handling, control breaks, and offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Computer Science or teacher confirmation of student demonstration of mastery of the Intro to Computer Science standards

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credit per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

MECHANICAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN I 4836 (MECH DD I) (VO40)

Mechanical Drafting and Design I provides students with a basic understanding of the detailing skills commonly used by drafting technicians. Areas of study include: lettering, sketching, proper use of equipment, geometric constructions with emphasis on orthographic (multi-view) drawings that are dimensioned and noted to ANSI standards. This course also provides a basic 142 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions understanding of the features and considerations associated with the operation of a computer aided design (CAD) system. Students will gain hands-on experience with Auto C.A.D. They will be expected to complete several projects relating to command topics. Topics include: 2D drawing commands, coordinate systems, editing commands, paper and model space, inquiry commands, layers, plotting, text, and basic dimensioning.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Computers in Design and Production

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

MECHANICAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN II 4838 (MECH DD II)

Mechanical Drafting and Design II covers working drawings both in detailing and assembly. Topics include: fastening devices, thread symbols and nomenclature, surface texture symbols, classes of fits, and the use of parts lists, title blocks and revision blocks. This course will also focus on advanced CAD features, including fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling for design. An overview of modeling, graphical manipulation, part structuring, coordinate system, and developing strategies of modeling will also be included. Advanced CAD will enable the student to make the transition from 2D drafting to 3D modeling. Students will draw and calculate three-dimensional problems. Theory and methods include graphic developments and the relationships between points, lines and planes, curved lines and surfaces, intersections, and development. Computer software and hardware experiences, as they relate to drafting and design, will be covered.

● Recommended Grade Level: 12

● Required Prerequisites: Mechanical Drafting and Design I

● Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

FINE ARTS INTRODUCTION

In order to provide a quality education for every child in Indiana, it is important to provide for all aspects of human growth. The artistic, expressive, and cultural aspects of each child’s intellectual, emotional, physical, and social development are vital components of this growth. Research involving the impact of arts education upon mental functions supports the convictions of many educators, parents, and business leaders that the fine arts are essential due to their ability to provide students with the means to think, feel, and understand the world around them in unique ways. Literacy in the arts strengthens a person’s participation in society by enhancing problem solving and communication skills as well as fostering self-expression, aesthetic awareness, and multiple points of view. For these reasons, a curriculum in each of the fine arts should be available to all students so that they may become self-directed toward lifelong learning in the arts. The purpose of each fine arts curriculum is to promote lifelong participation in the arts by developing skilled creators, performers, critics, listeners, and observers of the arts. Students can use the arts as a means of: (1) self-expression and communication, (2) development of critical thinking skills, (3) self-knowledge and understanding of the world around them, and, (4) increasing awareness of the artistic heritage of other cultures, as well as their own. Students who are proficient in the fine arts grow in their ability to think and learn independently. Their view of the world expands as creative avenues to expression and understanding are developed. Ultimately, the entire community benefits through the creativity, vision, and empathy fostered in the fine arts. In order for this to happen, students must be immersed in opportunities to learn about the arts, perform and create in one or more of the art forms, and learn to analyze and critique the arts. The goals for students in grades kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12) are to enable each student to do the following:

● Develop one’s artistic skills;

● Become confident in one’s abilities in the arts;

● Become a creative problem solver;

● Appreciate the value of the arts;

● Communicate through the arts;

● Communicate about the arts;

● Exhibit knowledge of the historical and cultural diversity of the arts; and

● Exhibit knowledge of criticism and aesthetics in the arts.

MUSIC COURSE TITLES

ADVANCED CHORUS (L) 4188 (ADV CHOR) (MU36)

Advanced Chorus is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Advanced Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning and Intermediate Chorus

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory course 177 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions

 

ADVANCED CONCERT BAND (L) 4170 (ADV BAND) (MU50)

Advanced Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. This course provides students with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning and Intermediate Concert Band

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory course

 

BEGINNING CHORUS (L) 4182 (BEG CHOR) (MU34)

Beginning Chorus is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Beginning Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory course

 

BEGINNING CONCERT BAND (L) 4160 (BEG BAND) (MU30)

Beginning Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory course

 

INTERMEDIATE CHORUS (L) 4186 (INT CHOR) (MU35)

Intermediate Chorus is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Intermediate Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning Chorus

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

 

INTERMEDIATE CONCERT BAND (L) 4168 (INT BAND) (MU40)

Intermediate Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. This course includes a balanced comprehensive study of music that develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Students study a varied repertoire of developmentally appropriate concert band literature and develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning Concert Band

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course 181 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions

 

PIANO AND ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD (L) 4204 (PIANO KEY) (MU42)

Piano and Electronic Keyboard is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Music Technology and Instrumental Music. Students taking this course are offered keyboard classes in order to develop music proficiency and musicianship. Students perform with proper posture, hand position, fingering, rhythm, and articulation; compose and improvise melodic and harmonic material; create and perform simple accompaniments; listen to, analyze, sight-read, and study a variety of keyboard literature; study the elements of music as exemplified in a variety of styles; and make interpretive decisions.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 183 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

Laboratory Course

 

MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION 4206 (MUS HIST) (MU60)

Music History and Appreciation is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Music and standards for this specific course. Students receive instruction designed to explore music and major musical styles and periods through understanding music in relation to both Western and Non-Western history and culture. Activities include analyzing and describing music; evaluating music and music performances; and understanding relationships between music and the other arts, as well as disciplines outside of the arts.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for two successive semesters of instruction, provided that defined standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

 

MUSIC THEORY AND COMPOSITION (L) 4208 (MUS THEORY) (MU55)

Music Theory and Composition is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Music and standards for this specific course. Students develop skills in the analysis of music and theoretical concepts. Students develop ear training and dictation skills, compose works that illustrate mastered concepts, understand harmonic structures and analysis, understand modes and scales, study a wide variety of musical styles, study traditional and nontraditional music notation and sound sources as tools for musical composition, and receive detailed instruction in other basic elements of music.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for two successive semesters of instruction, provided that defined standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

● Fulfills requirement for 1 to 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

VISUAL ARTS COURSE TITLES

 

CERAMICS (L) 4040 (CERAMICS) (AR34)

Ceramics is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in ceramics engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create works of art in clay utilizing the processes of hand building, molds, wheel throwing, slip and glaze techniques, and the firing processes. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

 

DRAWING (L) 4060 (DRAWING) (AR40)

Drawing is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in drawing engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create drawings utilizing processes such as sketching, rendering, contour, gesture, and perspective drawing and use a variety of media such as pencil, chalk, pastels, charcoal, and pen and ink. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma ● Laboratory Course

 

INTRODUCTION TO THREE-DIMENSIONAL ART (L) 4002 (3D ART) (AR31)

Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

 

INTRODUCTION TO TWO-DIMENSIONAL ART (L) 4000 (2D ART) (AR30)

Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

 

PAINTING (L) 4064 (PAINTING) (AR42)

Painting is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking painting engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production that lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create abstract and realistic paintings, using a variety of materials such as mixed media, watercolor, oil, and acrylics as well as techniques such as stippling, gouache, wash, and impasto. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art related careers.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

 

SCULPTURE (L) 4044 (SCULPT) (AR35)

Sculpture is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in sculpture engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production. Using materials such as plaster, clay, metal, paper, wax, and plastic, students create portfolio quality works. Students at this level produce works for their portfolios that demonstrate a sincere desire to explore a variety of ideas and problems. They create realistic and abstract sculptures utilizing subtractive and additive processes of carving, modeling, construction, and assembling. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

 

ADVANCED THREE-DIMENSIONAL ART (L) 4006 (ADV 3D ART) (AR47)

Advanced Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about 188 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

 

ADVANCED TWO-DIMENSIONAL ART (L) 4004 (ADV 2D ART) (AR45)

Advanced Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

● Laboratory Course

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

CURRENT PROBLEMS, ISSUES, AND EVENTS 1512 (CPIE) (SS42)

Current Problems, Issues, and Events gives students the opportunity to apply investigative and inquiry techniques to the study of significant problems or issues. Students develop competence in (1) recognizing cause and effect relationships, (2) recognizing fallacies in reasoning and propaganda devices, (3) synthesizing knowledge into useful patterns, (4) stating and testing hypotheses, and (5) generalizing based on evidence. Problems or issues selected will have contemporary historical significance and will be studies from the viewpoint of the social science disciplines. Community service programs and internships within the community may be included.

● Recommended Grade Level: none

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. Course may be repeated for credit if the content of the course changes.

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

 

ECONOMICS 1514 (ECON) (SS55)

Economics examines the allocation of resources and their uses for satisfying human needs and wants. The course analyzes economic reasoning and behaviors of consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, institutions, governments, and societies in making decisions. Students 266 Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions explain that because resources are limited, people must make choices and understand the role that supply, demand, prices, and profits play in a market economy. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity and economic reasoning; supply and demand; market structures; the role of government; national economic performance; the role of financial institutions; economic stabilization; and trade.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills the Economics requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, Core 40 with Technical Honors and International Baccalaureate diplomas

Fulfills a Social Studies requirement for the General Diploma only

● Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

 

INDIANA STUDIES 1518 (IN STUDIES) (SS72)

Indiana Studies is an integrated course that compares and contrasts state and national developments in the areas of politics, economics, history, and culture. The course uses Indiana history as a basis for understanding current policies, practices, and state legislative procedures. It also includes the study of state and national constitutions from a historical perspective and as a current foundation of government. Examination of individual leaders and their roles in a democratic society will be included and student will examine the participation of citizens in the political process. Selections from Indiana arts and literature may also be analyzed for insights into historical events and cultural expressions.

● Recommended Grade Level: none

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Must be offered at least once per school year

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

 

PSYCHOLOGY 1532 (PSYCH) (SS44)

Psychology is the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. The course is divided into eight content areas: History and Scientific Method, Biological Basis for Behavior, Development, Cognition, Personality and Assessment, Abnormal Psychology, Socio-Cultural Dimensions of Behavior, and Psychological Thinking. History and Scientific Method explores the history of psychology, the research methods used, and the ethical considerations that must be utilized. Biological Basis for Behavior focuses on the way the brain and nervous system function, including sensation, perception, motivation and emotion. Development analyzes the changes through one’s life including the physical, cognitive, emotional, social and moral development. Cognition focuses on learning, memory, information processing, and language development. Personality and Assessment explains at the approaches used to explain one’s personality and the assessment tools used. Abnormal Psychology explores psychological disorders and the various treatments used for them. Socio-Cultural Dimensions of Behavior covers topics such as conformity, obedience, perceptions, attitudes and influence of the group on the individual. Psychological Thinking explores how to think like a psychologist and expand critical thinking skills needed in the day-to-day life of a psychologist.

● Recommended Grade Level: none

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 1540 (US GOVT) (SS50)

Indiana Department of Education High School Course Titles and Descriptions United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States. Responsible and effective participation of citizens is stressed. Students understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and governments and understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens and how these are part of local, state, and national government. Students examine how the United States Constitution protects rights and provides the structure and functions of various levels of government. Analysis of how the United States interacts with other nations and the government’s role in world affairs is included in this course. Using primary and secondary resources, students will articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues. As a result, they will be able to explain the role of individuals and groups in government, politics, and civic activities and the need for civic and political engagement of citizens in the United States.

● Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Fulfills the Government requirement for all diplomas

 

UNITED STATES HISTORY 1542 (US HIST) (SS40)

United States History is a two-semester course that builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of U.S. History and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. After reviewing fundamental themes in the early development of the nation, students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History. Students develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time. 

● Recommended Grade Level: none

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

Fulfills the US History requirement for all diplomas

 

WORLD HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION 1548 (WLD HST/CVL) (SS31)

World History and Civilization emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Key events related to people and places as well as transcultural interaction and exchanges are examined in this course. Students are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. They will examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice and process skills of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes. There will be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.

● Recommended Grade Level: none

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Fulfills the Geography History of the World/World History and Civilization graduation requirement for all diplomas

 

ETHNIC STUDIES 1516 (ETH STUDIES) (SS70)

Ethnic Studies provides opportunities to broaden students’ perspectives concerning lifestyles and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States. This course will either focus on a particular ethnic group or groups, or use a comparative approach to the study of patterns of cultural development, immigration, and assimilation, as well as the contributions of specific ethnic or cultural groups. The course may also include analysis of the political impact of ethnic diversity in the United States.

● Recommended Grade Level: none

● Recommended Prerequisites: none

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit

● Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Must be offered at least once per school year

 

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 1562 (US HIST AP) (SS60)

AP United States History is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. AP United States History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about U.S. history from approximately 1491 to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Seven themes of equal importance — identity; peopling; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; environment and geography; and ideas, beliefs, and culture — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places. 

       Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12 

       Recommended Prerequisites: none.

       Students should be able to read a college level textbook and write grammatically correct, complete sentences.  Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

        Fulfills the US History requirement for all diplomas

HEALTH and WELLNESS

HEALTH and WELLNESS EDUCATION 3506 (HLTHandWELL)(PE40)

Health and Wellness, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for Health and Wellness and provides the basis to help students adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. Health education should contribute directly to a student’s ability to successfully practice behaviors that protect and promote health and avoid or reduce health risks. Through a variety of instructional strategies, students practice the development of functional health information (essential concepts); determine personal values that support health behaviors; develop group norms that value a healthy lifestyle; develop the essential skills necessary to adopt, practice, and maintain health-enhancing behaviors. This course includes the application of priority areas in a planned, sequential, comprehensive health education curriculum. Priority areas include: promoting personal health and wellness, physical activity, and healthy eating; promoting safety and preventing unintentional injury and violence; promoting mental and emotional health, a tobacco free lifestyle and an alcohol- and other drug-free lifestyle; and promoting human development and family health. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills of health and wellness core concepts, analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills, health-enhancing behaviors, and health and wellness advocacy skills.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: 8th grade health education

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum

Fulfills the Health and Wellness requirement for all diploma types

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education I and II, and Elective Physical Education are based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for Physical Education. These courses identify what a student should know and be able to do as a result of a quality physical education program. Physical literacy is defined by SHAPE America a “the ability to move with competence and confidence in a wide variety of physical activities in multiple environments that benefit the healthy development of the whole person.” The goal of a physically educated student and physically literate student is to maintain appropriate levels of cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition, knowledge skills, and confidence necessary for a lifetime of healthful physical activity. Through a variety of instructional strategies, students practice skills that demonstrate that the physically literate individual. This includes demonstrating competency in a variety of motor skills and movement patterns; applying knowledge of concepts, principles, strategies and tactics related to movement and performance; demonstrating the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness; exhibiting responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others; and recognizing the value of physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression and/or social interaction. Physical Education courses are designated as laboratory course and, as such, 25% of course time must be spent in activity. Adapted physical education must be offered, as needed, in the least-restrictive environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.

 

ELECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION - WEIGHT TRAINING (L) 3560 (ELECT PE) (PE50)

Elective Physical Education, a course based on selected standards from Indiana’s Academic Standards for Physical Education, identifies what a student should know and be able to do as a result of a quality physical education program. The goal of a physically educated student is to maintain appropriate levels of cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life. Elective Physical Education promotes lifetime sport and recreational activities and provides an opportunity for an in-depth study in one or more specific areas. A minimum of two of the following activities should be included: team sports; dual sports activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance. This course includes the study of physical development concepts and principles of sport and exercise as well as opportunities to develop or refine skills and attitudes that promote lifelong fitness. Students have the opportunity to design and develop an appropriate personal fitness program that enables them to achieve a desired level of fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEPs and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11.

● Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

● Recommended Prerequisites: Physical Education I and II

● Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 8 credits

● Counts as an Elective requirement for all diplomas

The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction provided defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

● Classes are co-educational unless the activity involves bodily contact or groupings based on an objective standard of individual performance developed and applied without regard to gender.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION I (L) 3542 (PHYS ED) (PE30)

Physical Education I focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum that provides students with opportunities to actively participate in at least four of the following: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all of which are within the framework of the skills, knowledge and confidence needed by the student for a lifetime of healthful physical activity and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEPs and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11.

● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Required Prerequisites: Grade 8 Physical Education

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum

● Fulfills part of the Physical Education requirement for all diplomas

● Classes are co-educational unless the activity involves bodily contact or groupings based on an objective standard of individual performance developed and applied without regard to gender.

● Adapted physical education must be offered, as needed, in the least restrictive environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.

As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II (L) 3544 (PHYS ED II) (PE31)

Physical Education II focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum that provides students with opportunities to actively participate in four of the following areas that were not included in Physical Education I: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all of which are within the framework of the skills, knowledge and confidence needed by the student for a lifetime of healthful physical activity and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEPs and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11. ● Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

● Required Prerequisites: Physical Education I

● Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum

● Fulfills part of the Physical Education requirement for all diplomas

● Classes are co-educational unless the activity involves bodily contact or groupings based on an objective standard of individual performance developed and applied without regard to gender.

● Adapted physical education must be offered, as needed, in the least-restrictive environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.

As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity.